Interactive Narrative GDC Talks (Part 3)

Previously 1 and 2. Here are a few more — the last set, for now, though I note that the GDC Vault has made a lot of past years’ material free, so I may go back and dig out some recommendations from those as well.

Anyway!

Microtalks 2015, Richard Lemarchand, Emily Short, Lisa Brown, Matt Boch, Naomi Clark, Tim Rogers, Holly Gramazio, Celia Pearce, Cara Ellison, Rami Ismail. (Recorded talk.) This includes me talking about why everyone should play tabletop storygames. It also contains hilarious microgame concepts, some beautiful reflections on intimacy in play, art in games, recommendations about workflow, and reflections about how badly games reach out to non-English speakers. This was an enormously fun session to be part of.

The Design in Narrative Design, Jurie Horneman. (Slideshow only.) Jurie makes the case for how systems design and narrative design must be integrated, which is something of a hobby-horse of mine as well.

Computers Are Terrible Storytellers — Let’s Give Humans a Shot, Stephen Hood. (Slideshow with notes.) Addresses limitations in computer-based story-telling, and looks at card-based storytelling games, tabletop RPGS and (yay) storygames again. Gets into more detail about Fiasco than I had time to in my microtalk, and talks about how these relate to their game project Storium.

One thought on “Interactive Narrative GDC Talks (Part 3)

  1. I can highly recommend the Loom postmortem by Brian Moriarty:

    http://www.gdcvault.com/play/1021862/Classic-Game-Postmortem

    The talk mentions IF – it was designed to be completed by players, and not stump them too much with puzzles. This decision came about after surveys showed that the most beloved Infocom games are the ones that players managed to actually completed, and players rarely reached the end of the games.

    The reasoning behind the graphical distaff input system is also mentioned, which tries to bring the player closer to the actions the avatar is performing – a feeling that I get from typing parser commands :)

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